A Photographers & Visitors Guide & Timeless Stories

North London

About Picture this UK

Picture this UK (picturethisuk.org) Contains:- Best Places to Photograph in London, Best Places to Photograph near London, Best Places to Visit in London, Best Places to Visit near London, Best places to see in London and 100 + places to visit in London. Both inside and out.

Tower Bridge

British Museum

Please click on the ⇒Gallery⇐ for more

 

 

 

 

 


Vestry House Museum, Walthamstow And

To the left is the Vestry House Museum (website ⇒) and to the right is a quaint corner ⇒ and a church with some stained glass.

The vestry House Museum history and artifacts.

There are always accusations of corruption.  Both true and manufactured.



Edwin Alliot Verdon-Roe built and flew the first British working aircraft.  It crashed, but only a little bit.  He went on to produce the Avro 504, the most used British aircraft of of WWI.   Initially WWI was called the Great War, they didn’t know there would be another.

 







The more modern style of bicycle had a chain and gearing so that the big front wheel of the penny-farthing was no longer needed.  Bicycle clubs became very popular.

And, a pleasant garden out the back.

And, then there is a history of poverty and how it was dealt with.

Slowly, slowly it gets better.  The desire to help keeps on being born, unstoppable and defiant.  More at Wheels on Fire ⇐ .

And~

The Boat Lift.  Re-titled the the True Nature of Humanity by blogger Cindy Hope and worth knowing the truth it speaks.

And ~

And, be strong and be defiant and great each day new day as a gift.


Stained Glass and A Quaint Corner in Walthamstow

Not far from here is Walthamstow Street Market ⇒ which dates from 1885 and is the longest street market in Europe. Also in Walthamsow is the William Morris Gallery ⇐ and just behind that is beautiful Lloyd Park ⇐.


This spot is up St Marys Rd or by bus up Church Hill.  The sign post is rather whimsical as the only place open to the general public is the Vestry Museum and the church (for services and events).   There is of course a pub with a garden.  

Down the hill is Walthamstow.  Behind the tree is the Vestry House Museum (in another post).  To the right is one of the Alms Houses.

The Ancient House.  And, there’s that pub again.  Did I mention that it has a garden ?

And a n ancient Pillar Box for post.

St Mary’s Church is open for services and a number of events.  I managed to sneak in while they were preparing for a concert.

The above can be expanded for reading. Click on the image and then again to expand.

There wasn’t a lot of stained glass but it was of good quality.




So it’s goodbye from sunny (sometimes) Walthamstow


Lloyd Park, Walthamstow and a Mystery Tune

Lloyd Park is right behind the William Morris Gallery ⇐ which has a some outstanding exhibits.  Lloyd Park ⇒ has some pleasant lawns amongst trees and is surrounded by a very pretty moat.  Further down there is a quite beautiful mystery tune but I have no idea who created it.  First the moat.




At the far end is the Delice café and some more park with an art gallery (next time).  Meantime more of the moat.

Add a little whimsy and the mystery tune.

This tune has been passed around for years but nobody knows who created it or where it came from.  So, if anybody can identify it, I would be grateful.   Meantime it is beautiful, calming and very suited to the pictures.



And, back to reality, perhaps.  🙂


William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow

William Morris (1834 to 1896) ⇒ was a writer, illustrator, textile/wallpaper designer, a social activist and founder of the Kelmscott Press. He had a considerable influence upon design during and after the Victorian period and was a close associate of Rossetti, Webb, Ruskin and Burne-Jones.

The gallery is free to enter and contains additional works by Burne-Jones.  It is not a huge collection but there is a lot of educational material and some artifacts with a real wow factor.   In addition the gallery provides an online collection, exhibitions (Mary Morris from October 2017 to January 2018), workshops and masterclasses.  Please see the gallery website ⇒ .  The easiest way to get to the gallery is at the bottom of this page.

More of William Morris can be found at the Red House ⇐ in Bexleheath (south-east of London) where he founded the decorative arts company, Morris, Marshal & Faulkner & Co which included wives and other family members.






The above wallpaper was for Queen Victoria and required 66 separate woodcuts (that’s how it was done) for each section.

The stained glass is by Edward Burne-Jones






For a closer look please right-click on the image, select “open in a new tab” and then left click in the tab/image to enlarge.

 

 


Ruskin advised aspiring artists to copy a work by Albert Dürer “until you can’t look at anything else”.  William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones spent hours with the above Knight, Death and the Devil.

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Bust of William Morris

The easiest way to get to the gallery is by traveling to Tottenham Hale Rail Station (or Blackhorse Road Staion) and then take the number 123 bus which stops right outside the gallery pictured below.


Behind the gallery is the gallery garden and further on is the very pretty Lloyd Park ⇐.  Together with the free gallery it makes a very pleasant day out. 🙂


The Charles Dickens Museum

Charles Dickens was more than a novelist, as can be seen at London’s Charles Dickens Museum ⇒.

The museum includes a large number of educational items together with some furniture and artifacts from Dickens life.   Not far away is the Foundling Museum ⇐  which represents a charity supported by Dickens.

A little walk through some of the exhibits common to a Dickens day.





A chalice presented to Charles Dickens by the the Morning Chronicle



Whilst there is a fee to enter the museum, there is a pleasant indoor/outdoor café that is free to enter.


The Foundling Museum, London

The Foundling Museum includes history and artifacts of the Foundling Hospital.  The creation of the hospital began as a campaign in 1720 by sea captain Thomas Coram to relieve the plight of abandoned children.  Eventually, in 1739, a charter for a foundling hospital was granted by King George II.  Over the years the charity was supported by notables such as Handel, Hogarth and Charles Dickens..

Statue of Thomas Coram

The museum holds a number of exhibitions and displays and it is well worth checking the website ⇒,  the hospital history ⇒ and Coram’s Charity history ⇒.

King George II by John Shackleton

The hospital was based on well meaning intent and saved many young lives.  Nevertheless, life could be harsh in a stern regime especially for boys, as told by the harrowing tale of Tom Mckenzie (The Last Foundling ⇒).

Girls Uniform


Although perhaps not all the time.

Foundling Girls in the Chapel by Sophia Anderson

The museum contains numerous works of art donated by the artists.

The March of the Guards to Finchley by Hogarth




Duke of Cambridge


Robert Gray



Hetty Feather

Hetty Feather was a temporary exhibition based around the heroin’s exploits at odds with the strictures of a foundling’s life.  The stories have been in book and TV form.

The young patients at Great Ormond Street Hospital, inspired by the Hetty Feather stories and the lack of kindness that they expose, produced a number of art works telling of the kindness that they receive in more modern times.   Some are on show at the Foundling Museum.  This one caught my eye.

The Kindness Scale.

I have always believed and always observed that when children are treated with wisdom and shown kind example then they show us the the true nature of humanity.  Another example that kind nature being here ⇐  and more of the past that made the present in Wheels on Fire ⇐. 

Have a kind day.


The London Waterbus and Regents Canal

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The London Waterbus operates between Camden Lock Market ⇐ and Little Venice on the Regents Canal.  The waterbus has a seasonal timetable ⇒ and the journey time is approximately 50 minutes. The Little Venice destination is a charming pool with a barge cafe and an enchanting barge puppet theatre ⇓.

The canal is part of a huge network that was once the lifeblood of trading Britain, moving goods and raw materials between ports and the hinterland by horse-drawn barge. Many of the old canals have been restored and now provide for house boats and holiday barges.  History ⇒ and scenic Barge Holidays ⇒ (one source) and the Norfolk Broads Holiday River Boats ⇒ (no canal locks).

Many canals have tunnels and this section of the Regents Canal has two. The longest UK tunnel of 3.24 miles is in the north of England at Standedge ⇒ (pronounced Stannige).  The long tunnels did not have towpaths and men had to lie on the cargo and push the barge along by walking along the roof or walls of the tunnel (called legging).  Professional leggers were available at one shilling per hour and the Standedge tunnel would take a back-breaking three hours to traverse with a fully laden barge.

Here are just a few snaps from the London Waterbus journey.

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Starting from a small cut just past the lock at Camden Market the waterbus passes St Martin’s Church and then some pleasant foilage.

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Then there are several embassies.

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The route passes through Regents Park (London) Zoo, although all that can be seen from the canal is the giant aviary.

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Cunningham Place.

Catholic Apostolic Church Maida Vale

One of the few remaining Catholic Apostolic Churches (Maida Vale).  A curious religious movement which was founded by three self appointed apostles in England in 1831 and spread to Germany and USA.  The church ceased ordination in 1901 and so became virtually extinct by the 1970’s.

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Arriving at Little Venice there is the barge cafe.

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And, a fine view back across the pool.

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On the other side of the Little Venice pool is the Puppet Theatre Barge ⇒, which magically appears from Richmond between October and the following July.  Whilst it may not look like much from the outside, the inside is warm and cosy and the performances are skillful and enchanting and usually suitable for a broad age range.


Camden Market, Camden Lock Market, Horse Tunnel Market and Stables Market

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Upper Camden High Street

Imagine an Alladin’s cave within a cornucopia fed by a horn of plenty.  In the Camden Markets one can find eatables, wearables, carryables, sparklies, wall and ceiling hangables, film cameras and magical hidden caves of delight.

If you intend any serious shopping then print a large Google map of the market area north of Camden Lock and another south of the lock. That way you can retrace your steps to the best bargains.  There are some overpriced items and Camden is very busy at the weekends so buyer beware.  On the other hand there are some unique craft items.

To get there use London Underground Rail to Camden Town on the Northern Line.  There are two exits.  Use the one onto Camden High St and walk up the road with the main intersection at your back.

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Camden Market is the smallest of the markets but is a bit bigger then it looks.

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Camden Lock Market is a lot bigger than it looks.

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The building on the right is the famous Dingwalls ⇒ music venue and the Comedy Loft ⇒.   A little further on from the lock is the stop for the London Waterbus ⇐ to Little Venice.

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The market halls are quite fascinating and lead down to the canal side with a number of eateries.

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On the side away from canal is Camden Lock Place and another market area. Turn right at the sight of Shaka Zulu and you will come back to the High Street.

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This picture is with the High Street at my back and you will find Gilgamesh on your Google map.  Don’t go back onto the High Street but venture down the little alley on the right of the picture.

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The first thing that strikes one is a magic carpet of spiced aromas from all over the world.  I got the impression that if I stayed too long I would be forever mesmerized and never leave.

But, if you continue then there is an Alladin’s cave with many side alleys to watch out for.

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Camden Lock and the Regents Canal are part of a huge canal network stretching across Britain and the lock once provided stables and a hospital for the barge horses.

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Hidden away, it is one of largest markets in Camden with a plethora of arts, crafts and fashion.  I can only show a small part of it.

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If you can find your way out, passing this sign, then there is yet another market area curving away into the distance but eventually returning to the canal.

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One of Camden’s Little Wizards

Returning to the canal one might take a coffee and watch some of the little wizards taking a bath.  Then there is eating and drinking and making merry or the Dingwalls ⇒ music venue or the Comedy Loft ⇒ or a short walk up the road to The Roundhouse Theatre ⇒ at Chalk farm (where you booked a ticket) or, earlier in the day, the London Waterbus ⇐ to Little Venice and the Puppet Theatre Barge⇒ (October to July) .

One might happily contemplate any of these delights or the soft ghostly figures of a horse drawn canal barge with the mellow spirits of a bargee family taking tea in the quiet of the evening, or wake up in front of one’s computer screen having been spellbound by the little wizard.  Well, one might.  🙂


Burgh House and Hampstead Museum Interior

Hampstead Museum A Child of Africa by Christine Gregory

Hampstead Museum A Child of Africa by Christine Gregory

Burgh House contains the Hampstead Museum⇒ which, although small, is quite pleasant and useful to those with an interest in the locality and its history.  The house also provides an indoor/outdoor café (The Buttery) with some well kept flora⇐, is very near to Fenton House⇐ and not far from Hampstead Heath and Kenwood House⇐.

The Artwork

Hampstead Museum Peggy Jay Gallery

Hampstead Museum Peggy Jay Gallery

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Hampstead Museum George Charlton Portrait

Hampstead Museum George Charlton Portrait

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Burgh House Hampstead Museum George Charlton Figures

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Burgh House Hampstead Museum Painting

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Hampstead Museum Viaduct on Hampstead Heath by Rea Stavropoulos

Hampstead Museum Viaduct on Hampstead Heath by Rea Stavropoulos

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The History

A sample of Hampstead history exhibits, spanning from the Mesolithic period to the present day. The exhibits include items from WWII.

Hampstead Museum Flint Artifacts

Hampstead Museum Flint Artifacts

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Burgh House Hampstead Museum Mesolithinc People

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Burgh House Hampstead Museum Beginnings

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Burgh House Hampstead Museum 19th Century

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Hampstead Museum Mayor's Chair

Hampstead Museum Mayor’s Chair