A Photographers & Visitors Guide & Timeless Stories

Posts tagged “Gardens

The Red House at Bexleyheath

21 pics. The Red House is in a continuous state of renovation and hence a little sparse inside.  Nevertheless, it is intriguing, full of history and surrounded by gardens that are both beautiful and tranquil.  The house was designed by Phillip Web for his friend William Morris.  Both were very creative and have a long history of respect from their peers.  There is a lot more of the history at the end of this post and here is the website ⇒ with entry fees.

Nearby is the sumptuous Danson House ⇐ and it is not very far to the more ancient Hall Place ⇐.

In Walthamstow (North London) there is the free William Morris Gallery ⇐ which is well worth a look.

Meanwhile :-

The Red House Croquet Lawn with the equipment for those who know how to play.






The murals are perhaps not as vibrant as they appear here, but this is what the camera saw and hasn’t been enhanced.  I think it is perhaps because of the quite extraordinary light from the windows.









The history is readable by right-clicking on the image, select “Open in New Tab” from the pop-up menu and then left-click on the image to magnify.  Return here by exiting the new tab.




Hollyhocks

Of course the last say ⇐ must be given to the flowers who reliably appear year after year.


The London Garden Museum in Lambeth

The London Garden Museum is situated in and around the old church of St Mary adjacent to Lambeth Palace.  The church has origins dating back almost a thousand years.  It was deconsecrated in 1972 and saved from demolition by Rosemary Nicholson.  By 1977, Rosemary and her husband John had converted the old church into the world’s first Museum of Garden History.  Rosemary and John were admirers of John Tradescent ⇒ who is buried at St Mary and is credited as being the first great British gardener and plant hunter.   In more recent times the venue has become known as The Garden Museum.

In 2016 the museum was closed for remodeling, making use of  a Heritage Lottery grant. It was re-opened in May 2017.  Unfortunately the beautiful Knot Garden ⇒ has been lost during the remodeling and the external gardens still need some work.  The external gardens and café are free to enter but there is an entrance fee for the museum.    Website ⇒.

 

The seemingly humble lawnmower has been of considerable influence.  Before its invention, by Edwin Budding in 1830, grass was cut by scythe.  Only the rich could afford such a labour intensive luxury.  Even so it was only rough cut compared with today’s standards.  It was because of the lawnmower we have the English garden and advancements in lawn tennis, lawn bowls, cricket and golf.

The inside of the old church is in good condition and alongside of some gardening history are there is some quite stunning stained glass.



The potato, which has become an important food staple, was first brought to Europe from Peru by the Spanish in the latter part of the 16th century although Sir Walter Rayleigh is credited with bringing them to England a little later.  In Britain we refer to the potato chip as a crisp and the British chip is a kind of thick french fry.  Fish and chips being our main contribution to international cuisine. 😀

The Ancient Order of  Free Gardeners began in Scotland in the 17th century. The ancient order’s fortunes have been somewhat variable, more ⇒ .  Personally I think making people believe one’s services are for free is asking for trouble.  😀


A good view of this window is difficult because somebody put a garden shed in the way. Really.  I think it’s an experiment in avant-garden 😀 .  I wrote them a note on the subject.   They haven’t written back.

In Memorium to Herbert Lyttelton 1884-1914


Although close to a busy thoroughfare and still a work in progress, the garden is free and a pleasant place to sit.  🙂


Ightham Mote

 

Ightham Mote (pron; I tham) is a well preserved medieval manor house that was built in the 14th century and is near to Sevenoaks in Kent. The approach is down into a wooded dell that is not at all dingily. 

Their website ⇒ and the wiki history ⇒.

The manor house contains an interesting museum of artifacts from various eras (here  ⇐ ) and is surrounded by very pleasant gardens and an extensive array of footpaths throughout the surrounding area.  Ightham mote has never been inhabited by very ambitious people or involved in dramatic events.  Its gentle past is perhaps responsible for its very peaceful atmosphere and has made it a pleasure to visit.  🙂






Across the bridge and into the courtyard.



One enters the house under the rose covered arch.  Note the large dog kennel.  There is a picture of its inhabitant later.


Outside is just the beginning of the gardens and rural walks. Turn around and there are the stables.


Inside the stables there are a few pictures including one of the dog who inhabited the courtyard kennel.

There is an extraordinary painting inside the house ⇐ and I hope that you enjoyed your visit.


Waddesdon Manor and Gardens

Waddesdon Manor North Fountain

17 pics. Waddesdon Manor is near Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire.  The manor was completed in 1898 as a sumptuous weekend residence for Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild and has passed through four generations of Rothschilds until 1958 when it was bequeathed to the National Trust.

The extraordinary interiors are here ⇐ and for more information and visiting please see the website ⇒.

Above is the North Fountain where the estate shuttle stops.  Turn around and there is the manor house.

Waddesdon Manor House



The sloping balustrades of the turret follow the line of the internal spiral staircase.  For a closer look at an image; right-click on an image, choose “Open Link in New Tab” and then left-click on the opened image to magnify.


A view back along the drive from the south-west corner of the manor house.  The grounds are a little short of flowers at this time of year (early May) but it is a quiet time to  visit. 

The house has an extensive wine cellar that is open to visitors.  The two black towers on the right of the above picture are modern art made of wine bottles.   I suppose the artist had to have something to drink whilst musing on the composition and then found inspiration in the empties 🙂 .

A view of the rear and the parterre garden.

A view of the parterre garden from a rear second story window.

From the south-west corner of the house there is path that leads to the aviary.

Rothschilds’ Mynah Bird – A critically endangered species from NW Bali.

I’m not always comfortable about caging animals but these are well kept and have an easy and extended life.  Many of the birds are rare and colorful.  Unfortunately most of the them were playing find the composer, otherwise known as Haydn Seek.

The grounds are extensive and a great place for a picnic.



The rose garden was not quite in bloom (early May).


So it’s goodbye from me.

And, it’s goodbye from ‘im.  Biscuit, what biscuit ?.  It twasn’t me guv.

I hope you enjoyed your visit and enjoy the remarkable interiors ⇐.