A Photographers & Visitors Guide & Timeless Stories

West London

Apsley House – The Wellington Museum

Apsley House (Wellington Museum) is one of the most ornate houses in London with a stunning collection of artwork.  Unfortunately it is also one of the few places where photography is not allowed.  Some photographs can be obtained from flickr or from the archives and are permitted for personal use.   Their website is here ⇒.  And the Wellington Collection is here ⇒ and fabulous house interiors here ⇒

Attributed to Elliot Brown on Flickr licensing at Link ⇒

Attributed to Craig Morey on Flickr licensing at  Link ⇒


Leighton House

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce

Leighton House is one of the very few venues featured on this blog where photography is not allowed. But is surely worth a visit.  There is much more to see at Leighton House, and the Leighton House website is here ⇒.  Viewers may also be interested in nearby Holland Park (inc Kyoto Gardens) and the extraordinary victoriana at 18 Stafford Terrace.

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Kevin Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Keven Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce


About Picture this UK

Picture this UK (picturethisuk.org) Contains:- Best Places to Photograph in London, Best Places to Photograph near London, Best Places to Visit in London, Best Places to Visit near London, Best places to see in London and 100 + places to visit in London. Both inside and out.

Tower Bridge

British Museum

Please click on the ⇒Gallery⇐ for more

 

 

 

 

 


Victoriana at 18 Stafford Terrace and the Sambournes

Edward Lynley Sambourne and his wife (Marion) took residence of 18 Stafford Terrace in Kensington in 1874. The Sambourne family and descendants maintained the Victorian style and content.  The house was taken over and maintained by the Victorian Society and then the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989.

The website ⇒ is informative, interesting and shows much of Edward Lylynley Sambourne’s work as an illustrator.   There are a variety of tours available and open house (when photography is allowed) on some afternoons.  Hence the website is an essential read for those who wish to visit and may wish to note there are four flights of stairs without a lift.

The website is also used by Leighton House.  An interesting place but photography is not allowed (2017). 

For 40 years Edward Lynley Sambourne was notable contributor to the comedic and satirical magazine Punch ⇒ (its website includes a large gallery of cartoons).  The house at 18 Stafford Terrace is full of drawings, artworks and some very fine stained glass.  He also created the earliest draft drawings for the illustrated version of the Rev Charles Kingsley’s book the Water-Babies.  More of Edward Lynley Sambourne’s work ⇒ as shown on Flickr.

The house and its atmosphere has been so carefully preserved that it is like walking back in time, although one can only enter the edge of each room.  Enjoy ~  🙂















. . and goodnight all.   🙂


Battersea Park And Children’s Zoo and Otters

“Clare? Clare?! Are you listening to me?” “I’m not talking to you, Richard!”  –  Contributed by blogger Dunelight

More beautiful otters below.  First Battersea Park.  The park is larger than it looks and provides a boating lake, children’s play areas, a plant shop, bicycle hire, cafeteria and children’s zoo.  More ⇒.



Battersea Bridge on the Thames

Battersea Park Children’s Zoo

There is an entrance fee for the zoo.  More information and a broad range of facilities for children can be found here ⇒.  Below are a few fun photographs but there is a lot more to see.



The park has modern technology.  Here is its e-mu.

Mara (Patagonian Cavy)


Meerkats


Young children can take a tunnel into the bubble and see the meerkats close up.

And, right next door are the otters.


Its feeding time and the otters wait by the magic door.



And, each have their own portion.

Time for a little lie down after all that walking about.


The London Garden Museum in Lambeth

The London Garden Museum is situated in and around the old church of St Mary adjacent to Lambeth Palace.  The church has origins dating back almost a thousand years.  It was deconsecrated in 1972 and saved from demolition by Rosemary Nicholson.  By 1977, Rosemary and her husband John had converted the old church into the world’s first Museum of Garden History.  Rosemary and John were admirers of John Tradescent ⇒ who is buried at St Mary and is credited as being the first great British gardener and plant hunter.   In more recent times the venue has become known as The Garden Museum.

In 2016 the museum was closed for remodeling, making use of  a Heritage Lottery grant. It was re-opened in May 2017.  Unfortunately the beautiful Knot Garden ⇒ has been lost during the remodeling and the external gardens still need some work.  The external gardens and café are free to enter but there is an entrance fee for the museum.    Website ⇒.

 

The seemingly humble lawnmower has been of considerable influence.  Before its invention, by Edwin Budding in 1830, grass was cut by scythe.  Only the rich could afford such a labour intensive luxury.  Even so it was only rough cut compared with today’s standards.  It was because of the lawnmower we have the English garden and advancements in lawn tennis, lawn bowls, cricket and golf.

The inside of the old church is in good condition and alongside of some gardening history are there is some quite stunning stained glass.



The potato, which has become an important food staple, was first brought to Europe from Peru by the Spanish in the latter part of the 16th century although Sir Walter Rayleigh is credited with bringing them to England a little later.  In Britain we refer to the potato chip as a crisp and the British chip is a kind of thick french fry.  Fish and chips being our main contribution to international cuisine. 😀

The Ancient Order of  Free Gardeners began in Scotland in the 17th century. The ancient order’s fortunes have been somewhat variable, more ⇒ .  Personally I think making people believe one’s services are for free is asking for trouble.  😀


A good view of this window is difficult because somebody put a garden shed in the way. Really.  I think it’s an experiment in avant-garden 😀 .  I wrote them a note on the subject.   They haven’t written back.

In Memorium to Herbert Lyttelton 1884-1914


Although close to a busy thoroughfare and still a work in progress, the garden is free and a pleasant place to sit.  🙂


Canal Boat Cavalcade 2017 at Little Venice

There is a pool at the junction of the Regents Canal and Grand Union Canal that is now known as Little Venice.  Every year there is a Festival and Cavalcade of canal boats.  Some have traveled hundreds of miles using the vast network of canals that were once the lifeblood of Britain’s trade and industry.

There is a pleasant waterbus ⇐ between Camden Lock and Little Venice. At Little Venice there is a floating café and an enchanting puppet theatre ⇒ for all ages.

Canal boats became ornamental even as working boats.


A Small Sample of the Cavalcade



Some of the Characters



The ugly duckling.


“One likes to be a good sport, but if one more reveler refers to me as loofah neck I shall scream”.


Chelsea Physic Garden

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers DSC_6682

The Chelsea Physic (for healing) Garden ⇒ was established in 1673 and is the second oldest botanic garden in the UK after the Oxford University Botanic Garden ⇒. The garden has approximately 5,000 plants including those with exotic scents. It is a very peaceful and pleasant walled garden hidden away in west London. 

There are some free tours upon entry but there is an entry fee and charges for the workshops, courses and special tours. Please see the website link above.

The easiest approach is by the 170 bus (bound for Roehampton) from Victoria Station to Chelsea Physic Garden. On alighting, just outside the gardens educational center, walk back a short way along the bus route to Swan Walk and the main entrance is little way down that road.  Map of the Garden ⇐.

The garden is next to the the Royal Hospital Chelsea ⇒ (home of the Chelsea Pensioners).

Chelsea Physic Gardens Views and Flowers

Chelsea Physic Garden DSC_6640

 

Chelsea Physic Garden DSC_6702

 

In the Greenhouses

Chelsea Physic Garden Flower Pelargonium Rosa DSC_6569

Pelargonium Rosa

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers Pelargonium Milfield Gem DSC_6747

Pelargonium Milfield Gem

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers Pelargonium Bute DSC_6742

Pelargonium Bute

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers Pelargonium Copthorne DSC_6588

Pelargonium Copthorne

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers DSC_6737

 

Around the Gardens and Outdoor Flowers

Chelsea Physic Garden Statue of Sir Hans Sloane

Statue of Sir Hans Sloane

Sir Hans Sloane ⇒

Chelsea Physic Garden DSC_6637

 

Chelsea Physic Garden DSC_6730

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flower DSC_6696

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers DSC_6608

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers DSC_6615

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers DSC_6622

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers Helienthus Annuus Ring of Fire Sunflower

Helienthus Annuus – Ring of Fire Sunflower

 

Chelsea Physic Garden Flowers Sweet Pea

Sweet Pea


London Water and Steam Museum, Express Tavern and Kew

London Water and Steam Museum Garden DSC_6343

London Water and Steam Museum Garden

14 pics. Cities could not grow beyond a few tens of thousands and civilisation could not flourish without a plentiful supply of  clean water. Otherwise epidemics of water-borne diseases such as cholera and typhoid would devastate the population.  The development of filtration and pumping by steam engine was vital to progress.

The London Water and Steam Museum ⇒ (there is an entrance fee) explains the advances in water cleanliness and houses a number of steam-driven pumps, including some truly massive devices.  On designated days some of the engines can be seen working. 

The other essential was the disposal of waste and an ornate example of this can be found in east London at the renovated Crossness Pumping Station ⇐

To get to the Water and Steam Museum: On Leaving Kew Bridge station, turn right, pass the very pleasant Express Tavern ⇒, and turn into Green Dragon Lane.  The tall chimney is an easy landmark.

Alternatively Kew Gardens ⇐ which includes Kew Palace is just over the nearby bridge..

There is more about our use of steam and the role of fossil fuels at the Science Museum ⇐.

.

London Water and Steam Museum DSC_6296

.

London Water and Steam Museum 90 inch Steam Engine DSC_6319

The above Boulton and Watt 64 inch (piston/cylinder diameter of 64 inches) has a beam weighing 15 tons and delivered 2.5 million gallons of water per day and was last used in 1944.

London Water and Steam Museum 90 inch Steam EngineDSC_6331

This is the 90 inch Cornish engine with a beam weighing 32 tons and delivered 6.4 million gallons of water per day.  It was last used in 1943.  The steam cylinder is the massive dark object at the far end.  The nearer cylinder is the water pump.

London Water and Steam Museum 100 inch Steam Engine

This monster is the 100 inch Cornish engine. The 100 inch (8 foot and 4 inches wide) steam cylinder is the dark object the distance.  The beam weighs a staggering 54 tons and it once delivered 7.5 million gallons of water per day.  Built in 1869 it remained in service until 1958.

London Water and Steam Museum 100 inch Steam Engine DSC_6305

More :-

London Water and Steam Museum DSC_6272

.

London Water and Steam Museum DSC_6279

.

London Water and Steam Museum Waddon Steam Engine DSC_6288

The above is the Waddon steam pumping engine.  It was the last steam driven water pump used in the UK and remained in service until 1983.

London Water and Steam Museum DSC_6282

.

London Water and Steam Museum Triple expansion Engine

Above is a triple expansion engine.  Designed to be more efficient as most of the steam pressure is used by passing the output of one cylinder to the next.

London Water and Steam Museum DSC_6338

.

London Water and Steam Museum DSC_6340

On designated days (website ⇒) a small steam locomotive provides rides, although the track is very short.

Express Tavern at Kew

On the way back is the Express Tavern ⇒ which has a very pleasant menu and a broad range of beers.  Across the nearby bridge is Kew Gardens ⇐.


Ham House and the Oak Tree with an Eye

Ham House Oak Tree with Eye

If you got redirected by Google Images, Kew Place is here ⇐

19 pics.  I didn’t notice the eye (right in the middle) whilst I was taking the photograph at the back of Ham House.  It hasn’t been meddled with and probably has a rational explanation. There is probably a rational response like aaaargh.

The Ham House website ⇒ and about haunted Ham House ⇒.

You can get to Ham House using the 371 bus to Sandy Lane from near Richmond rail station or via York Gardens ⇐ (please check the post for bus and ferry travel) and then visit Ham House and return to Richmond rail using the 371 from Sandy Lane.

Ham House

Ham House

.

Ham House Charlotte Countess of Dysart by Joshua Reynolds 1775

Charlotte Countess of Dysart by Joshua Reynolds 1775

.

Ham House Main Hall

.

Ham House Table

.

Ham House Stairs

.

Ham House Ceiling

.

Ham House Long Hall

.

Ham House Side Room

.

Ham House Bedroom

.

Ham House Ornate Room

.

Ham House Painting of Sea Battle

.

Ham House, Tollemache Earl of Dysart

Tollemache Earl of Dysart

.

Ham House, Celar Bathroom

The above is a bath. It has a stool inside to sit on and get bathed.

Ham House, Cellar Kitchen

.

Ham House Garden

.

Ham House Cafe Garden

Cafe Garden

.

Ham House Dairy

Whimsical Dairy

The peeping Oak tree is just outside the dairy.

Ham House, Sir Lionel Tollemache

Sir Lionel Tollemache

The 4th Baronet, Sir Lyonel Tollemache, who kindly gave Ham House to the National Trust in 1948.