A Photographers & Visitors Guide & Timeless Stories

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Stained Glass and A Quaint Corner in Walthamstow

Not far from here is Walthamstow Street Market ⇒ which dates from 1885 and is the longest street market in Europe. Also in Walthamsow is the William Morris Gallery ⇐ and just behind that is beautiful Lloyd Park ⇐.


This spot is up St Marys Rd or by bus up Church Hill.  The sign post is rather whimsical as the only place open to the general public is the Vestry Museum and the church (for services and events).   There is of course a pub with a garden.  

Down the hill is Walthamstow.  Behind the tree is the Vestry House Museum (in another post).  To the right is one of the Alms Houses.

The Ancient House.  And, there’s that pub again.  Did I mention that it has a garden ?

And a n ancient Pillar Box for post.

St Mary’s Church is open for services and a number of events.  I managed to sneak in while they were preparing for a concert.

The above can be expanded for reading. Click on the image and then again to expand.

There wasn’t a lot of stained glass but it was of good quality.




So it’s goodbye from sunny (sometimes) Walthamstow


Postal Museum, London

The Royal Mail was first introduced by Henry VIII in 1516 and then made available to the public in 1635.  Later it became part of the General Post Office (GPO) which included the telephone system.  The Royal Mail has been integral to Britain’s growth and maintenance since early times.  More information (prices and location) can be found on it’s website ⇒.

Since early times the mail had to be protected from thieves and pirates.

 

 

 

It continued through two world wars, delivering to military personnel as well as civilians

 

 

The Royal Mail introduced innovations like the pneumatic delivery system, where a cylinder was sent by compressed air along a tube.  The Royal Mail system had more than 40 miles of tubes beneath London.  And ~.

 

 

 

Just across the road and down the hill a little is the the old Royal Mail’s underground system, where you can have a pre-booked ride (please see the website link above).

 

 

Down that hole

And return pre-packed ready to mail home.  🙂



The Charles Dickens Museum

Charles Dickens was more than a novelist, as can be seen at London’s Charles Dickens Museum ⇒.

The museum includes a large number of educational items together with some furniture and artifacts from Dickens life.   Not far away is the Foundling Museum ⇐  which represents a charity supported by Dickens.

A little walk through some of the exhibits common to a Dickens day.





A chalice presented to Charles Dickens by the the Morning Chronicle



Whilst there is a fee to enter the museum, there is a pleasant indoor/outdoor café that is free to enter.


Battersea Park And Children’s Zoo and Otters

“Clare? Clare?! Are you listening to me?” “I’m not talking to you, Richard!”  –  Contributed by blogger Dunelight

More beautiful otters below.  First Battersea Park.  The park is larger than it looks and provides a boating lake, children’s play areas, a plant shop, bicycle hire, cafeteria and children’s zoo.  More ⇒.



Battersea Bridge on the Thames

Battersea Park Children’s Zoo

There is an entrance fee for the zoo.  More information and a broad range of facilities for children can be found here ⇒.  Below are a few fun photographs but there is a lot more to see.



The park has modern technology.  Here is its e-mu.

Mara (Patagonian Cavy)


Meerkats


Young children can take a tunnel into the bubble and see the meerkats close up.

And, right next door are the otters.


Its feeding time and the otters wait by the magic door.



And, each have their own portion.

Time for a little lie down after all that walking about.