A Photographers & Visitors Guide & Timeless Stories

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Leighton House

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce

Leighton House is one of the very few venues featured on this blog where photography is not allowed. But is surely worth a visit.  There is much more to see at Leighton House, and the Leighton House website is here ⇒.  Viewers may also be interested in nearby Holland Park (inc Kyoto Gardens) and the extraordinary victoriana at 18 Stafford Terrace.

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Kevin Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Keven Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce


Stained Glass and A Quaint Corner in Walthamstow

Not far from here is Walthamstow Street Market ⇒ which dates from 1885 and is the longest street market in Europe. Also in Walthamsow is the William Morris Gallery ⇐ and just behind that is beautiful Lloyd Park ⇐.


This spot is up St Marys Rd or by bus up Church Hill.  The sign post is rather whimsical as the only place open to the general public is the Vestry Museum and the church (for services and events).   There is of course a pub with a garden.  

Down the hill is Walthamstow.  Behind the tree is the Vestry House Museum (in another post).  To the right is one of the Alms Houses.

The Ancient House.  And, there’s that pub again.  Did I mention that it has a garden ?

And a n ancient Pillar Box for post.

St Mary’s Church is open for services and a number of events.  I managed to sneak in while they were preparing for a concert.

The above can be expanded for reading. Click on the image and then again to expand.

There wasn’t a lot of stained glass but it was of good quality.




So it’s goodbye from sunny (sometimes) Walthamstow


Postal Museum, London

The Royal Mail was first introduced by Henry VIII in 1516 and then made available to the public in 1635.  Later it became part of the General Post Office (GPO) which included the telephone system.  The Royal Mail has been integral to Britain’s growth and maintenance since early times.  More information (prices and location) can be found on it’s website ⇒.

Since early times the mail had to be protected from thieves and pirates.

 

 

 

It continued through two world wars, delivering to military personnel as well as civilians

 

 

The Royal Mail introduced innovations like the pneumatic delivery system, where a cylinder was sent by compressed air along a tube.  The Royal Mail system had more than 40 miles of tubes beneath London.  And ~.

 

 

 

Just across the road and down the hill a little is the the old Royal Mail’s underground system, where you can have a pre-booked ride (please see the website link above).

 

 

Down that hole

And return pre-packed ready to mail home.  🙂



The Charles Dickens Museum

Charles Dickens was more than a novelist, as can be seen at London’s Charles Dickens Museum ⇒.

The museum includes a large number of educational items together with some furniture and artifacts from Dickens life.   Not far away is the Foundling Museum ⇐  which represents a charity supported by Dickens.

A little walk through some of the exhibits common to a Dickens day.





A chalice presented to Charles Dickens by the the Morning Chronicle



Whilst there is a fee to enter the museum, there is a pleasant indoor/outdoor café that is free to enter.


Battersea Park And Children’s Zoo and Otters

“Clare? Clare?! Are you listening to me?” “I’m not talking to you, Richard!”  –  Contributed by blogger Dunelight

More beautiful otters below.  First Battersea Park.  The park is larger than it looks and provides a boating lake, children’s play areas, a plant shop, bicycle hire, cafeteria and children’s zoo.  More ⇒.



Battersea Bridge on the Thames

Battersea Park Children’s Zoo

There is an entrance fee for the zoo.  More information and a broad range of facilities for children can be found here ⇒.  Below are a few fun photographs but there is a lot more to see.



The park has modern technology.  Here is its e-mu.

Mara (Patagonian Cavy)


Meerkats


Young children can take a tunnel into the bubble and see the meerkats close up.

And, right next door are the otters.


Its feeding time and the otters wait by the magic door.



And, each have their own portion.

Time for a little lie down after all that walking about.


A Rare Opportunity to Photograph Inside London’s St Paul’s Cathedral

No longer available for 2017: There is a rare opportunity for visitors to photograph the interior of London’s St Paul’s Cathedral between 6:30 pm and 9 pm (last entry 8:15 pm) on the evenings of :-

  • Thursday 27th July 2017
  • Thursday 10th August 2017
  • Thursday 17th August 2017
  • Thursday 24th August 2017
  • Friday 25th August 2017
  • Monday 28th August 2017
  • Thursday 31st August 2017

This is for hand-held non-commercial photography only and the upper galleries will be closed for the evening. 

For those without cameras suitable for low-light conditions, the early evening may present the best opportunity.

For more information, ticket prices and booking in advance please click-on Summer Lates ⇒

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For a preview (photographs from 2015) and general admission, please click-on St Paul’s Cathedral ⇐ .

For permits and commercial photography/filming, please see here ⇒.

Enjoy.



UK Terrorist Attacks 2017

The terrorists have failed.  Not fear but defiance.  Not hate but unity.   Here in London’s Potters Fields and in Manchester.  In Manchester where a young American girl returned to play a concert and stood up for us all.

In London where, at short notice, there were thousands at the Potters Fields vigil.

Muslims came with sympathy and with courage and with confidence in the sanity of Londoners that we would not be perverted by the actions of a few.  They held banners and they laid flowers and they were applauded.

Such were the tokens of our defiance and unity.




And the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said:-

“London stands in defiance against this cowardly attack and our city and our people and our values and our way of live.

As the mayor of London I want to send a clear message to the sick and evil extremists who commit these hideous crimes; we will defeat you. You will not win.

And as a proud and patriotic British Muslim I say this: you do not commit these disgusting acts in my name. Your perverse ideology has nothing to do with the true values of Islam and you will never succeed in dividing our city.

We send our love to the victims’ families and all those injured and we thank our courageous emergency services and the brave Londoners who risked their lives. You are the best of us.

Our city is filled with great sorrow and anger tonight but also great resolve and determination. Because our unity and love will always be stronger than the hate of the extremists.

London will never be broken by terrorism. We will defeat the terrorists.”

And he was applauded.

And I say; London and the UK stand as a beacon of defiance and fair justice and refusal to blame the many for the actions of a few.  That is what we are and that is our strength and we shall not fall from that state of being.

 

⇐ Previously


Nunhead Cemetery

Nunhead is one of the “magnificent seven” privately owned cemeteries built during the 1800’s to accomodate the needs of a rapidly expanding London.  The others are Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park ⇒, Kensal Green, West Norwood,  Highgate, Abney Park and Brompton Cemetery.

Nunhead Cemetery is on quite a steep hill so there are bus route directions ⇒ to the top of the hill and include some other venues in the region.

To view the cemetery map, please click on and then again to magnify.

There are various routes with lots of ivy covered ancient gravestones but it was a sunny day so I kept to the cheerful.


Inside the old chapel there is some art work both modern and ancient.  There are occasional exhibitions and tours.  Please see the Friends of Nunhead Cemetery ⇒.






At the lower end exit/entrance of the cemetery turn left and then past the Waverly Arms are the bus stops.  It is not far to One Tree Hill, the Oak of Honor and St Augustine’s ⇐, but it is up a steep hill so please see the directions ⇐ for a bus route.  The same link shows a route to Peckham Rye Park.


Peckham Rye Park and Flowers

From stop V across the road from Peckham Rye rail station the numbers 63 and 363 buses travel south along the west side of Peckham Rye Park.  About half way along the park’s length is the easiest way to it’s centre where all the trees are.  The Café on The Rye is to the left by the car park, whilst straight on is :-

Peckham Rye Park Japanese Gardens




and :-

Sexby Gardens


If this is early April then summer must be amazing






and :-

Peckham Rye Park Lake

The lake is at the east side of the park and is a short distance to Nunhead Cemetery ⇒, but it is uphill so please see the directions ⇐ for a bus route.


St Augustine’s, One Tree Hill and the Oak of Honor

One Tree Hill is named after the Oak of Honor ⇒ and is a small nature reserve with St Augustine’s Church, the oak and a fine view across London.

The easiest way to get to One Tree hill and St Augustine’s is by the P12 bus from Honor Oak Park rail station to the top of the hill by road.  There is a path on the opposite side of the road which passes the Maha Lakshmi Vidya Bhavan.

There is an alternative route via Peckham Rye Park and Nunhead Cemtery here ⇐.

The path leads first to :-

 

 St Augustine’s Church

The church was built between 1870 and 1900 and has some fine architecture and stained glass.  It is open in the afternoon during the summer months and is always open on a Saturday morning.  More ⇒.  Please check the website for services and events before you visit.


St Augustine ⇒ (354 AD to 430 AD) was an early Christian theologian and philosopher.




These walls aren’t really speckled.  The effect is the consequence of an unusual mix of ambient light and a high ISO camera setting necessary for the dark alcove without flash.  I thought it was a pleasing effect so I left it in.





One Tree Hill

On retracing one’s footsteps there is a set of steps leading to the top of the hill and the Oak of Honor. 

If you think I’m climbing up there just to get a few photographs, then you must be ~

what ! no, stop that, get off.

Pesky elves. I wish they wouldn’t do that.

Oh well, since I’m here.


The Oak of Honor

This Oak of Honor ⇒ was planted in 1905 and is the third on that site.  The original oak marked the southern boundary of a region known as the Norman Honor of Gloucester ⇒ which began its existence in 1166.

Legend has it that Queen Elizabeth I took rest under an oak on the hill when she went a-maying in 1602.  Alternatively she had a picnic with Sir Richard Bulkeley on 1st of May. A-maying could have a variety of meanings including being quite frolicsome. 🙂

As an aside: The spelling of Honor, rather than the usual English spelling of Honour, derives from the antiquity of the place.  Early English favored “or” rather than “our” for many words.  These earlier spelling were transported to the Americas and remain in use.  England seems to have developed and favoured the alternatives due to a continued influx of languages.

Near to the oak is a fine view across London from One Tree Hill’s southern position.


The oak and view are at position 1 on the map.  To enlarge the map please click on and then gain to magnify.

The park proceeds down the far side of the hill to Brenchley Gardens where one can board the P12 bus again.  The bus can be used to go back to Honor Oak Park rail station (traveling West and then back up the hill) or the other way to Nunhead Cemetery or Peckham Rye Park (later posts).

Thank you for visiting and I hope you enjoyed the tour.