A Photographers & Visitors Guide & Timeless Stories

History

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey is founded upon a religious site of the 7th century.  A monastery until 1539.  Then an abbey and had the status of a cathedral until 1560. Although it is still referred to as an abbey, it currently has the status of a “Royal Peculiar” and is directly responsible to the monarch.  It has been the place of royal coronation and burial since 1066.

Sited next to the Houses of Parliament ⇒, it is open to the public (for a fee – see the Abbey website ⇒ and history ⇒) but photography is not allowed inside.

The interior photographs that follow are taken from the Abbey website’s photo-gallery ⇒ that provides downloads for personal use.



Apsley House – The Wellington Museum

Apsley House (Wellington Museum) is one of the most ornate houses in London with a stunning collection of artwork.  Unfortunately it is also one of the few places where photography is not allowed.  Some photographs can be obtained from flickr or from the archives and are permitted for personal use.   Their website is here ⇒.  And the Wellington Collection is here ⇒ and fabulous house interiors here ⇒

Attributed to Elliot Brown on Flickr licensing at Link ⇒

Attributed to Craig Morey on Flickr licensing at  Link ⇒


Leighton House

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce

Leighton House is one of the very few venues featured on this blog where photography is not allowed. But is surely worth a visit.  There is much more to see at Leighton House, and the Leighton House website is here ⇒.  Viewers may also be interested in nearby Holland Park (inc Kyoto Gardens) and the extraordinary victoriana at 18 Stafford Terrace.

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Kevin Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Keven Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce


About Picture this UK

Picture this UK (picturethisuk.org) Contains:- Best Places to Photograph in London, Best Places to Photograph near London, Best Places to Visit in London, Best Places to Visit near London, Best places to see in London and 100 + places to visit in London. Both inside and out.

Tower Bridge

British Museum

Please click on the ⇒Gallery⇐ for more

 

 

 

 

 


Cartoon Museum, London

The Cartoon Museum is moderately priced and hosts exhibitions, events and workshops for both children and adults (see website ⇒ ) and is very close to the British Museum ⇐ which is free to enter.  Cartoons and single frame caricatures  have been an integral part of British life and included political, satirical, sarcastic, social commentary, humour and the downright bawdy.  Earlier cartoons/caricatures, than those here, can be found at the Queens Gallery ⇒.

? but it is quite fascinating.




Although often irreverent, cartoonist could also be patriotic especially in times of war.

The infamous Andy Capp by Reg Smythe

And, a little social commentary from an unlikely source.

And, something to read.

And, learn how to draw cartoons.

Or the easy way, which made me hungry.


Vestry House Museum, Walthamstow And

To the left is the Vestry House Museum (website ⇒) and to the right is a quaint corner ⇒ and a church with some stained glass.

The vestry House Museum history and artifacts.

There are always accusations of corruption.  Both true and manufactured.



Edwin Alliot Verdon-Roe built and flew the first British working aircraft.  It crashed, but only a little bit.  He went on to produce the Avro 504, the most used British aircraft of of WWI.   Initially WWI was called the Great War, they didn’t know there would be another.

 







The more modern style of bicycle had a chain and gearing so that the big front wheel of the penny-farthing was no longer needed.  Bicycle clubs became very popular.

And, a pleasant garden out the back.

And, then there is a history of poverty and how it was dealt with.

Slowly, slowly it gets better.  The desire to help keeps on being born, unstoppable and defiant.  More at Wheels on Fire ⇐ .

And~

The Boat Lift.  Re-titled the the True Nature of Humanity by blogger Cindy Hope and worth knowing the truth it speaks.

And ~

And, be strong and be defiant and great each day new day as a gift.


Postal Museum, London

The Royal Mail was first introduced by Henry VIII in 1516 and then made available to the public in 1635.  Later it became part of the General Post Office (GPO) which included the telephone system.  The Royal Mail has been integral to Britain’s growth and maintenance since early times.  More information (prices and location) can be found on it’s website ⇒.

Since early times the mail had to be protected from thieves and pirates.

 

 

 

It continued through two world wars, delivering to military personnel as well as civilians

 

 

The Royal Mail introduced innovations like the pneumatic delivery system, where a cylinder was sent by compressed air along a tube.  The Royal Mail system had more than 40 miles of tubes beneath London.  And ~.

 

 

 

Just across the road and down the hill a little is the the old Royal Mail’s underground system, where you can have a pre-booked ride (please see the website link above).

 

 

Down that hole

And return pre-packed ready to mail home.  🙂



William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow

William Morris (1834 to 1896) ⇒ was a writer, illustrator, textile/wallpaper designer, a social activist and founder of the Kelmscott Press. He had a considerable influence upon design during and after the Victorian period and was a close associate of Rossetti, Webb, Ruskin and Burne-Jones.

The gallery is free to enter and contains additional works by Burne-Jones.  It is not a huge collection but there is a lot of educational material and some artifacts with a real wow factor.   In addition the gallery provides an online collection, exhibitions (Mary Morris from October 2017 to January 2018), workshops and masterclasses.  Please see the gallery website ⇒ .  The easiest way to get to the gallery is at the bottom of this page.

More of William Morris can be found at the Red House ⇐ in Bexleheath (south-east of London) where he founded the decorative arts company, Morris, Marshal & Faulkner & Co which included wives and other family members.






The above wallpaper was for Queen Victoria and required 66 separate woodcuts (that’s how it was done) for each section.

The stained glass is by Edward Burne-Jones






For a closer look please right-click on the image, select “open in a new tab” and then left click in the tab/image to enlarge.

 

 


Ruskin advised aspiring artists to copy a work by Albert Dürer “until you can’t look at anything else”.  William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones spent hours with the above Knight, Death and the Devil.

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Bust of William Morris

The easiest way to get to the gallery is by traveling to Tottenham Hale Rail Station (or Blackhorse Road Staion) and then take the number 123 bus which stops right outside the gallery pictured below.


Behind the gallery is the gallery garden and further on is the very pretty Lloyd Park ⇐.  Together with the free gallery it makes a very pleasant day out. 🙂


Victoriana at 18 Stafford Terrace and the Sambournes

Edward Lynley Sambourne and his wife (Marion) took residence of 18 Stafford Terrace in Kensington in 1874. The Sambourne family and descendants maintained the Victorian style and content.  The house was taken over and maintained by the Victorian Society and then the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989.

The website ⇒ is informative, interesting and shows much of Edward Lylynley Sambourne’s work as an illustrator.   There are a variety of tours available and open house (when photography is allowed) on some afternoons.  Hence the website is an essential read for those who wish to visit and may wish to note there are four flights of stairs without a lift.

The website is also used by Leighton House.  An interesting place but photography is not allowed (2017). 

For 40 years Edward Lynley Sambourne was notable contributor to the comedic and satirical magazine Punch ⇒ (its website includes a large gallery of cartoons).  The house at 18 Stafford Terrace is full of drawings, artworks and some very fine stained glass.  He also created the earliest draft drawings for the illustrated version of the Rev Charles Kingsley’s book the Water-Babies.  More of Edward Lynley Sambourne’s work ⇒ as shown on Flickr.

The house and its atmosphere has been so carefully preserved that it is like walking back in time, although one can only enter the edge of each room.  Enjoy ~  🙂















. . and goodnight all.   🙂


The Foundling Museum, London

The Foundling Museum includes history and artifacts of the Foundling Hospital.  The creation of the hospital began as a campaign in 1720 by sea captain Thomas Coram to relieve the plight of abandoned children.  Eventually, in 1739, a charter for a foundling hospital was granted by King George II.  Over the years the charity was supported by notables such as Handel, Hogarth and Charles Dickens..

Statue of Thomas Coram

The museum holds a number of exhibitions and displays and it is well worth checking the website ⇒,  the hospital history ⇒ and Coram’s Charity history ⇒.

King George II by John Shackleton

The hospital was based on well meaning intent and saved many young lives.  Nevertheless, life could be harsh in a stern regime especially for boys, as told by the harrowing tale of Tom Mckenzie (The Last Foundling ⇒).

Girls Uniform


Although perhaps not all the time.

Foundling Girls in the Chapel by Sophia Anderson

The museum contains numerous works of art donated by the artists.

The March of the Guards to Finchley by Hogarth




Duke of Cambridge


Robert Gray



Hetty Feather

Hetty Feather was a temporary exhibition based around the heroin’s exploits at odds with the strictures of a foundling’s life.  The stories have been in book and TV form.

The young patients at Great Ormond Street Hospital, inspired by the Hetty Feather stories and the lack of kindness that they expose, produced a number of art works telling of the kindness that they receive in more modern times.   Some are on show at the Foundling Museum.  This one caught my eye.

The Kindness Scale.

I have always believed and always observed that when children are treated with wisdom and shown kind example then they show us the the true nature of humanity.  Another example that kind nature being here ⇐  and more of the past that made the present in Wheels on Fire ⇐. 

Have a kind day.


The Red House at Bexleyheath

21 pics. The Red House is in a continuous state of renovation and hence a little sparse inside.  Nevertheless, it is intriguing, full of history and surrounded by gardens that are both beautiful and tranquil.  The house was designed by Phillip Web for his friend William Morris.  Both were very creative and have a long history of respect from their peers.  There is a lot more of the history at the end of this post and here is the website ⇒ with entry fees.

Nearby is the sumptuous Danson House ⇐ and it is not very far to the more ancient Hall Place ⇐.

In Walthamstow (North London) there is the free William Morris Gallery ⇐ which is well worth a look.

Meanwhile :-

The Red House Croquet Lawn with the equipment for those who know how to play.






The murals are perhaps not as vibrant as they appear here, but this is what the camera saw and hasn’t been enhanced.  I think it is perhaps because of the quite extraordinary light from the windows.









The history is readable by right-clicking on the image, select “Open in New Tab” from the pop-up menu and then left-click on the image to magnify.  Return here by exiting the new tab.




Hollyhocks

Of course the last say ⇐ must be given to the flowers who reliably appear year after year.


The London Garden Museum in Lambeth

The London Garden Museum is situated in and around the old church of St Mary adjacent to Lambeth Palace.  The church has origins dating back almost a thousand years.  It was deconsecrated in 1972 and saved from demolition by Rosemary Nicholson.  By 1977, Rosemary and her husband John had converted the old church into the world’s first Museum of Garden History.  Rosemary and John were admirers of John Tradescent ⇒ who is buried at St Mary and is credited as being the first great British gardener and plant hunter.   In more recent times the venue has become known as The Garden Museum.

In 2016 the museum was closed for remodeling, making use of  a Heritage Lottery grant. It was re-opened in May 2017.  Unfortunately the beautiful Knot Garden ⇒ has been lost during the remodeling and the external gardens still need some work.  The external gardens and café are free to enter but there is an entrance fee for the museum.    Website ⇒.

 

The seemingly humble lawnmower has been of considerable influence.  Before its invention, by Edwin Budding in 1830, grass was cut by scythe.  Only the rich could afford such a labour intensive luxury.  Even so it was only rough cut compared with today’s standards.  It was because of the lawnmower we have the English garden and advancements in lawn tennis, lawn bowls, cricket and golf.

The inside of the old church is in good condition and alongside of some gardening history are there is some quite stunning stained glass.



The potato, which has become an important food staple, was first brought to Europe from Peru by the Spanish in the latter part of the 16th century although Sir Walter Rayleigh is credited with bringing them to England a little later.  In Britain we refer to the potato chip as a crisp and the British chip is a kind of thick french fry.  Fish and chips being our main contribution to international cuisine. 😀

The Ancient Order of  Free Gardeners began in Scotland in the 17th century. The ancient order’s fortunes have been somewhat variable, more ⇒ .  Personally I think making people believe one’s services are for free is asking for trouble.  😀


A good view of this window is difficult because somebody put a garden shed in the way. Really.  I think it’s an experiment in avant-garden 😀 .  I wrote them a note on the subject.   They haven’t written back.

In Memorium to Herbert Lyttelton 1884-1914


Although close to a busy thoroughfare and still a work in progress, the garden is free and a pleasant place to sit.  🙂


Ightham Mote Interiors

Well hello and welcome to Ightham Mote, a pleasant idyll in Kent.  The interiors are presented as a walk through time including an extraordinary painting.  Views of the exterior and beautiful gardens and more information about this medieval manor house can be found here  ⇐.   But first, a little walk through time (although not necessarily in the right order 🙂 )  ~










The above is a corner of the Billiard Room situated across the main courtyard.  Back to the main building :-

A replica of Ellen Terry’s famous beetle-wing costume in which she played Lady Macbeth in 1888/89



Miss Elsie Palmer by John Singer Sargent 1890


Thank you for the visit and if you missed the exterior views then you can find them  here ⇐ .


Ightham Mote

 

Ightham Mote (pron; I tham) is a well preserved medieval manor house that was built in the 14th century and is near to Sevenoaks in Kent. The approach is down into a wooded dell that is not at all dingily. 

Their website ⇒ and the wiki history ⇒.

The manor house contains an interesting museum of artifacts from various eras (here  ⇐ ) and is surrounded by very pleasant gardens and an extensive array of footpaths throughout the surrounding area.  Ightham mote has never been inhabited by very ambitious people or involved in dramatic events.  Its gentle past is perhaps responsible for its very peaceful atmosphere and has made it a pleasure to visit.  🙂






Across the bridge and into the courtyard.



One enters the house under the rose covered arch.  Note the large dog kennel.  There is a picture of its inhabitant later.


Outside is just the beginning of the gardens and rural walks. Turn around and there are the stables.


Inside the stables there are a few pictures including one of the dog who inhabited the courtyard kennel.

There is an extraordinary painting inside the house ⇐ and I hope that you enjoyed your visit.


St Augustine’s, One Tree Hill and the Oak of Honor

One Tree Hill is named after the Oak of Honor ⇒ and is a small nature reserve with St Augustine’s Church, the oak and a fine view across London.

The easiest way to get to One Tree hill and St Augustine’s is by the P12 bus from Honor Oak Park rail station to the top of the hill by road.  There is a path on the opposite side of the road which passes the Maha Lakshmi Vidya Bhavan.

There is an alternative route via Peckham Rye Park and Nunhead Cemtery here ⇐.

The path leads first to :-

 

 St Augustine’s Church

The church was built between 1870 and 1900 and has some fine architecture and stained glass.  It is open in the afternoon during the summer months and is always open on a Saturday morning.  More ⇒.  Please check the website for services and events before you visit.


St Augustine ⇒ (354 AD to 430 AD) was an early Christian theologian and philosopher.




These walls aren’t really speckled.  The effect is the consequence of an unusual mix of ambient light and a high ISO camera setting necessary for the dark alcove without flash.  I thought it was a pleasing effect so I left it in.





One Tree Hill

On retracing one’s footsteps there is a set of steps leading to the top of the hill and the Oak of Honor. 

If you think I’m climbing up there just to get a few photographs, then you must be ~

what ! no, stop that, get off.

Pesky elves. I wish they wouldn’t do that.

Oh well, since I’m here.


The Oak of Honor

This Oak of Honor ⇒ was planted in 1905 and is the third on that site.  The original oak marked the southern boundary of a region known as the Norman Honor of Gloucester ⇒ which began its existence in 1166.

Legend has it that Queen Elizabeth I took rest under an oak on the hill when she went a-maying in 1602.  Alternatively she had a picnic with Sir Richard Bulkeley on 1st of May. A-maying could have a variety of meanings including being quite frolicsome. 🙂

As an aside: The spelling of Honor, rather than the usual English spelling of Honour, derives from the antiquity of the place.  Early English favored “or” rather than “our” for many words.  These earlier spelling were transported to the Americas and remain in use.  England seems to have developed and favoured the alternatives due to a continued influx of languages.

Near to the oak is a fine view across London from One Tree Hill’s southern position.


The oak and view are at position 1 on the map.  To enlarge the map please click on and then gain to magnify.

The park proceeds down the far side of the hill to Brenchley Gardens where one can board the P12 bus again.  The bus can be used to go back to Honor Oak Park rail station (traveling West and then back up the hill) or the other way to Nunhead Cemetery or Peckham Rye Park (later posts).

Thank you for visiting and I hope you enjoyed the tour.


Museum of the Order of St John

The Order of St John (St John’s Ambulance Brigade) was founded in 1099 and is an international organisation.  The museum is on St John’s Lane which is off Clerkenwell Road.  That part which is frequently open, is not very big but packed with educational placards and video. 

On a tour day there is additional access to upstairs rooms and artifacts, see the website ⇒.  Further down this page there is a virtual tour of the upstairs rooms and a video about the Order of St Johns and St John’s Ambulance Brigade  .







The short history is concise and well presented.

Please see the website ⇒ for tour days and use the contact details to determine if photography is allowed on tours.

There is no sound with the virtual tour.



Postman’s Park

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Postman’s Park contains a wonder. “The Material Prosperity Of A Nation Is Not An Abiding Possession: The Deeds of Its People Are”.  There are many plaques, each tell a story.

The park is opposite the entrance to London’s St Bartholomew’s Hospital on King Edward Street.  It is small but has many benches and is very pretty in summer (this is a dank day in February).   About Postman’s Park ⇒.

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For a closer view please right-click on an image, choose “Open Link in New Tab” then left click on the image to magnify. Close the new tab to return here..

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They weren’t famous people and could easily have been forgotten. George Watts made sure that they were not.

Postman's Park Plaques 2

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Museum of London Docklands

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14 pics. The Museum of London Docklands ⇒ is in the Docklands region (nearest rail being West India Quay on the Docklands Light Railway) and is all about the history of the Docklands as distinct from the more extensive history of London at the Museum of London ⇐ at 150 London Wall. 

The Museum of London Docklands is full of historical information, is free to enter and non-commercial photography is allowed.

There is a lift that goes to the top floor, which is a good place to start.  I do prefer stairs that go down.

The Sailors Walk

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More Exhibits

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In Commemoration of the Great Strike Sept 1889 ⇒.

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Tobacco Weighing Station

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The First Bantamweight Lonsdale Belt

For a closer look of the history please click on the image and then again to enlarge.

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Steel Consul Shelter

There is an extensive area covering the war years during which the docks were a prime target..

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Incendiary Attack by William Ware 1940

London Docklands Now

Dockland Cranes

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Woodscaper

For more of the Past That Made the Present there is Wheels on Fire ⇐, a timeline at the Science Museum ⇐ and the History of Navigation ⇐.


Museum of London

Museum of London Inside

An Extinct form of Wild Ox – The Aurochs 245,000 to 186,000 BC                             The 2012 London Olympics

34 pics.  The Museum of London ⇒ is at 150 London Wall (as distinct from the Museum of: London Docklands ⇐).  Inside is a quite extensive and interesting museum with a timeline that begins on the top floor, from prehistoric times to present day.  The museum is free to enter and non-commercial photography is allowed.

The museum is a short walk along St Martin’s Le Grand from St Paul’s underground rail station (central Line) .

Educational sessions, including those for young students, are available.

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Back Foot of the Straight Tusked Elephant 781,000 to 50,00 years before present.

There are a large number of prehistoric, bronze age, pre-Roman, Roman, post-Roman (Saxon) and Norman exhibits.  Alongside are a number of educational placards and films.  Too many items to show here and get to the exhibitions of later London.  So, here is just a taste of early times.

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museum-of-london-saxon-axesWhen the Romans finally left, about 400 AD, England was mostly populated by Saxon settlers and invading Norseman/Danes (Vikings) in the north.  The Saxons were weren’t necessarily all that war-like but spent most of their time farming.  The Norseman were commonly seafaring traders, it is just that some of them were a bit cantankerous.

On the other hand (imported from Waltham Abbey and King Harold’s Day ⇐ ) :-

King Harolds Day DSC_0971King Harolds Day DSC_0972In 954 Alfred (the Great) became the first King of All England.  By 6th January 1066 the position was taken up by Harold Goodwinson (Harold II).  On 25th September 1066 Harold Goodwinson defeated the viking forces of Harald Hadrada and Tostig at Stamford Bridge in the north.  Harold was then faced with a forced march of 241 miles to fend of the Norman invader, William (the Conqueror), in the south.  By October 14th the Saxon forces were defeated and Harold killed.  Thus began the Norman era and thence the reign of the Plantagenets and then the Tudors.

The London City Wall

Within the old city walls, William the Conqueror should only be referred to as William.  This is because he did not conquer London but instead gave it a charter.

To see the timeline click-on and then again to magnify.  It surprised me to note that our Magna Carta (in 1215 a limited Bill of Rights) was signed at roughly the same time as Genghis Khan conquered Persia.

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Between 1558 and 1603 was the great boom of wealth, culture and global influence of the Elizabethan era.  The effect continued for some time after.

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A silk dress for Anne Fanshawe (1625-1680) the daughter of the Lord Mayor of London

Sorry about the glare, I couldn’t find a way around it.

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An Eighteenth Century Pleasure Garden

Britain and particularly London continued to advance in wealth and prestige :-

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– although not for all:-

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– for some there was debtor’s prison.  For others there was stark poverty, starvation, disease with the work house as the only relief in later times. There is the Industrial Revolution and it’s long term impact at the London Science Museum⇐  and Wheels on Fire ⇐ (the struggle for fair play).

The Victorian Walk

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This is a fascinating walk into the past, complete with atmospheric background sounds.

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The 1920’s boom

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A lift at the Savoy Grill

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At the mini cinema you can take a seat and watch an old newsreel.

But then there was the 1930’s depression, and then :-.

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London and Britain itself were almost destroyed.  It needed the backing (and loss) of Britain’s entire empire, with considerable determination and sacrifice to hold on.  That effort stopped Hitler’s progress and provided a foot-hold for the USA to join us in the liberation of Europe.  If Britain had not been able to provide that foot-hold, the consequences could have been very different

At the end of WWII, Britain was in dire straits.  Rationing continued until 1953, eight years after the wars end. Austerity continued until the early 1960’s

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Then things began to pick up.  6D is six old pence (when they were 240 to a UK pound).

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Then London began to swing again with a great burst of original art, music and cultural evolution.  Not just in London but all over Britain.  We may not be so bright at the present but:-.

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For more of the Past That Made the Present there is Wheels on Fire ⇐, a timeline at the Science Museum ⇐ and the History of Navigation ⇐.


Guildhall in London

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The Great Hall

12 pics. London’s Guildhall was built between 1411 and 1440.  It can be found near Bank Underground Rail station, just off Gresham Street. History ⇒.  Right beside Guildhall is the Guildhall Art Gallery ⇐ which includes the remains of a Roman amphitheater.

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The entrance is just to the left of this picture and the art gallery to the right (another post). The building is mainly used for social functions but members of the public can view the Great Hall, when not in use. Please see the website ⇒

In the Great Hall their are a number of statues and stone tableaus.  Here are just three.

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Sir Winston Churchill

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Trafalgar and Nelson

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Lord Mayor William Beckton

And, at the far end.

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Great Hall Stained Glass

I found a small unlocked side door ( I do love an unlocked side door) and some steps leading upwards.  I found myself in the Old Library.

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Old Library

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There were a number of old paintings and some tapestries.

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Joust on London Bridge 1390

Another side door and some steps down ~

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Charles I, Edward VI and Elizabeth I

Leading to a a small hall.

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It was here I got nabbed by security, who were confused as to how I got into the members area. I agreed with them and was politely escorted out with my badly behaved camera (well, if they will leave old libraries just lying about).

Thank you for the visit and may all your side doors be rabbit holes.


About Canterbury

18 pics. Canterbury is famous for its antiquity, Canterbury Cathedral, numerous ancient buildings, the martyrdom of Thomas Becket, a destination for pilgrims, the oldest UK Church still in use (St Martins), Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Rupert the Bear by Mary Tourtel and Smallfilms (Clangers and Bagpus and many others) by Oliver Postgate and Peter Firmin.

Canterbury is well worth a visit particularly as there is so much to see within walking distance.  My own favourites were the Heritage Museum, The Beaney House (free) and Canterbury Cathedral.

⇐ Pilgrims Way is a walking route stretching all the all the way from Winchester, which is over a hundred miles away.  Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales refers to the fictional stories told by a group of pilgrims on their way to Canterbury.

A shorter route is from Canterbury West Station which leads onto St Dunstans Street (turn right out of the station) and thence to St Peter’s Street (turn left – and about 5 minutes walk altogether).

Canterbury’s Shepherd Neame Pub

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On St Dunstans Street one passes one of these, which speaks for itself.  The traveller might note that “Bishops Finger” refers to an ale not an ancient form of acupuncture.  😀

A little further on, is the old town’s Westgate which houses a small museum⇒ and access to the view from the battlements.

Canterbury’s Westgate

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This is the northern of three branches of the River Stour running through Canterbury. This branch runs under the Westgate.  There are chauffeur driven Canterbury Westgate Punts ⇒ during the summer .

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We are now on the other side of the Westgate with the Guildhall on the left.   Turning around and walking down St Peter’s Street the road becomes traffic free and on the left is St Peter’s Lane and the church.

Canterbury’s St Peter’s Anglican Church

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St Peter’s Anglican Church ⇒ has been in use for over 900 years and is open every day.

Canterbury’s Eastbridge Hospital of St Thomas

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Inside the Hospital of St Thomas

Further along, the road then becomes the High Street and on the right is the Hospital of St Thomas (Eastbridge).  More pictures and information ⇒.

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Opposite St Thomas’s is the Wildwood and access to Canterbury Historic River Tours ⇒ (not available in winter) beside the mid branch of the River Stour.

A little further along, on one’s right, is Stour Street and after about 4 minutes walk is the marvelous Heritage Museum ⇐.   It is not open all year round so do check the website.

Canterbury’s Heritage Museum

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Inside Canterbury Heritage Museum

Beside the museum is Water Lane which leads to a small footbridge that crosses a branch of the River Stour and on to Greyfriars Gardens.  The gardens are beautifully serene and include free access to Greyfriars Chapel ⇒ . Opening times for the chapel are limited so please check the link. 

Canterbury Punting Co ⇒ operate along this stretch of the Stour during the summer.

Returning to the High Street, a short walk south is the Beaney Institute.

Canterbury’s Beaney Instiute

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Beaney Institute

The Beaney Institute is free to enter and provides a number of exhibits/events. More with pictures of the exhibits ⇐ .

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A quick look back along the High St to the Westgate. Turn around again, continue along the High St and on one’s left is Mercery Lane which leads to the cathedral.  On the opposite side of the High St is St Margarets Street and The Canterbury Tales Museum ⇐  where you can immerse yourselves in the sights, sounds and smells of medieval Britain.  A little further along St Margaret’s Street one might catch an evenings Ghost Tour ⇒ (usually on a Friday or Saturday).

Alternatively, walk a little further along the High St and there is Butchery Lane with the Roman Museum on the right hand side.

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The view along Butchery Street.

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Inside the Roman Museum

Roman Museum ⇒  I wasn’t all that impressed for the cost but you can get a cheaper combined ticket with the more extensive Heritage Museum (although not open all year).

Turn left at the end of Butchery Lane and one comes to the War Memorial and the entrance to Canterbury Cathedral (on the right) on Burgate.

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Canterbury Cathedral

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Canterbury Cathedral ⇐ with pictures of the extraordinary interior.

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Canterbury has some interesting shops and plenty of inns and other eateries.

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This is Bell and Crown which has plenty of seating outside and is on Sun Street (extending from Burgate).  As you can see it is a friendly place (really) and I was pleased to find that it serves from a wholesome and enjoyable menu.

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Canterbury’s St Augustines Abbey

Turning back along Burgate and continuing to the end, one then crosses a main road (Lower Bridge St) onto Church St which leads to Monastery St.  To one’s left is Findons Gate and Lady Wootons Green (with statues). To one’s right is Longport and the entrance to St Augustines Abbey ⇐ museum and ruin (please see the link for the gate and green).

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St Augustines Abbey ruin

Longport continues on to the west and to North Holmes Road which leads to St Martins Church ⇒ . St Martins is the oldest working church in the UK and one can visit on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays (please check the link above).  The second oldest (by a small margin) is All Hallows by the Tower ⇐ (London).

There is plenty more to see in Canterbury including Canterbury Castle ⇒ ruin.  I hope you enjoyed your brief tour and thank you for visiting.


St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury

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All About Canterbury  ⇐

St Augustine’s Abbey was founded shortly after Canterbury Cathedral (Ad 597)⇐ and is now a small museum and the ruins left after the Dissolution of the Abbeys during the reign of Henry VIII.  The entrance is on Longport (Road) just east of Canterbury old town.  Entry is limited during the winter months and there is a charge.  Whether it is worth the cost does depend on ones interest.  Please see the Website ⇒.

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These buildings appear to be part of Kings School and are not accessible. The two towers in the distance are Fyndons Gate which can be viewed from the outside on Monastery Street just opposite Lady Wootons Green.  The green has statues of of the 6th century monarchs, King Ethelbert and Queen Bertha.  I missed these so:-

Fyndons Gate by Google Images⇒   (except the one with the greenish statue that is really the entrance to Canterbury Cathedral).  

Lady Wootons Green and Statues by Google Images ⇒.


The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge in Canterbury

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All About Canterbury  ⇐

The Royal Museum and Free Library was founded in 1858 and moved to the Beaney Institute in 1891 following a bequest by George Beaney to build an ‘Institute for Working Men’.  The building is on the High Street and is bigger than it looks, housing an information centre, modern library, cafe and several exhibition rooms.  Entry is free and it is child friendly with tables for games and drawing.  The Beaney is an award winning facility with exhibitions, educational facilities and events. Website ⇒.

Just a few of the exhibits :- .

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Sculptures of the Magna Carta Barons ⇒.

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Child friendly.

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Granny Knowles by Laura Knight

Kent was a summertime haunt for travelers and people from the East End of London to engage in hop picking.

And:-

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And :-

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And:-

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And, part of a temporary exhibition by Grayson Perry called “The Vanity of Small Differences”.

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The Eastbridge Hospital of St Thomas in Canterbury

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All About Canterbury  ⇐

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The Eastbridge Hospital of St Thomas is on Canterbury High street and is part of a bridge over a branch of the river Stour.  It isn’t very big but they only ask £2 for a visit.  Visiting ⇒.

The site was created in 1180 as a place of hospitality for poor pilgrims visiting Canterbury Cathedral ⇐ where Thomas (later St Thomas) Becket was murdered in 1170 and became a martyr.  Next to the chapel is an Alms House with 8 occupied flats.

 

 

 

 

 

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