A Photographers & Visitors Guide & Timeless Stories

Art

Cartoon Museum, London

The Cartoon Museum is moderately priced and hosts exhibitions, events and workshops for both children and adults (see website ⇒ ) and is very close to the British Museum ⇐ which is free to enter.  Cartoons and single frame caricatures  have been an integral part of British life and included political, satirical, sarcastic, social commentary, humour and the downright bawdy.  Earlier cartoons/caricatures, than those here, can be found at the Queens Gallery ⇒.

? but it is quite fascinating.




Although often irreverent, cartoonist could also be patriotic especially in times of war.

The infamous Andy Capp by Reg Smythe

And, a little social commentary from an unlikely source.

And, something to read.

And, learn how to draw cartoons.

Or the easy way, which made me hungry.


Lloyd Park, Walthamstow and a Mystery Tune

Lloyd Park is right behind the William Morris Gallery ⇐ which has a some outstanding exhibits.  Lloyd Park ⇒ has some pleasant lawns amongst trees and is surrounded by a very pretty moat.  Further down there is a quite beautiful mystery tune but I have no idea who created it.  First the moat.




At the far end is the Delice café and some more park with an art gallery (next time).  Meantime more of the moat.

Add a little whimsy and the mystery tune.

This tune has been passed around for years but nobody knows who created it or where it came from.  So, if anybody can identify it, I would be grateful.   Meantime it is beautiful, calming and very suited to the pictures.



And, back to reality, perhaps.  🙂


William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow

William Morris (1834 to 1896) ⇒ was a writer, illustrator, textile/wallpaper designer, a social activist and founder of the Kelmscott Press. He had a considerable influence upon design during and after the Victorian period and was a close associate of Rossetti, Webb, Ruskin and Burne-Jones.

The gallery is free to enter and contains additional works by Burne-Jones.  It is not a huge collection but there is a lot of educational material and some artifacts with a real wow factor.   In addition the gallery provides an online collection, exhibitions (Mary Morris from October 2017 to January 2018), workshops and masterclasses.  Please see the gallery website ⇒ .  The easiest way to get to the gallery is at the bottom of this page.

More of William Morris can be found at the Red House ⇐ in Bexleheath (south-east of London) where he founded the decorative arts company, Morris, Marshal & Faulkner & Co which included wives and other family members.






The above wallpaper was for Queen Victoria and required 66 separate woodcuts (that’s how it was done) for each section.

The stained glass is by Edward Burne-Jones






For a closer look please right-click on the image, select “open in a new tab” and then left click in the tab/image to enlarge.

 

 


Ruskin advised aspiring artists to copy a work by Albert Dürer “until you can’t look at anything else”.  William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones spent hours with the above Knight, Death and the Devil.

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Bust of William Morris

The easiest way to get to the gallery is by traveling to Tottenham Hale Rail Station (or Blackhorse Road Staion) and then take the number 123 bus which stops right outside the gallery pictured below.


Behind the gallery is the gallery garden and further on is the very pretty Lloyd Park ⇐.  Together with the free gallery it makes a very pleasant day out. 🙂


Victoriana at 18 Stafford Terrace and the Sambournes

Edward Lynley Sambourne and his wife (Marion) took residence of 18 Stafford Terrace in Kensington in 1874. The Sambourne family and descendants maintained the Victorian style and content.  The house was taken over and maintained by the Victorian Society and then the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989.

The website ⇒ is informative, interesting and shows much of Edward Lylynley Sambourne’s work as an illustrator.   There are a variety of tours available and open house (when photography is allowed) on some afternoons.  Hence the website is an essential read for those who wish to visit and may wish to note there are four flights of stairs without a lift.

The website is also used by Leighton House.  An interesting place but photography is not allowed (2017). 

For 40 years Edward Lynley Sambourne was notable contributor to the comedic and satirical magazine Punch ⇒ (its website includes a large gallery of cartoons).  The house at 18 Stafford Terrace is full of drawings, artworks and some very fine stained glass.  He also created the earliest draft drawings for the illustrated version of the Rev Charles Kingsley’s book the Water-Babies.  More of Edward Lynley Sambourne’s work ⇒ as shown on Flickr.

The house and its atmosphere has been so carefully preserved that it is like walking back in time, although one can only enter the edge of each room.  Enjoy ~  🙂















. . and goodnight all.   🙂