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Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey is founded upon a religious site of the 7th century.  A monastery until 1539.  Then an abbey and had the status of a cathedral until 1560. Although it is still referred to as an abbey, it currently has the status of a “Royal Peculiar” and is directly responsible to the monarch.  It has been the place of royal coronation and burial since 1066.

Sited next to the Houses of Parliament ⇒, it is open to the public (for a fee – see the Abbey website ⇒ and history ⇒) but photography is not allowed inside.

The interior photographs that follow are taken from the Abbey website’s photo-gallery ⇒ that provides downloads for personal use.



Apsley House – The Wellington Museum

Apsley House (Wellington Museum) is one of the most ornate houses in London with a stunning collection of artwork.  Unfortunately it is also one of the few places where photography is not allowed.  Some photographs can be obtained from flickr or from the archives and are permitted for personal use.   Their website is here ⇒.  And the Wellington Collection is here ⇒ and fabulous house interiors here ⇒

Attributed to Elliot Brown on Flickr licensing at Link ⇒

Attributed to Craig Morey on Flickr licensing at  Link ⇒


Leighton House

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce

Leighton House is one of the very few venues featured on this blog where photography is not allowed. But is surely worth a visit.  There is much more to see at Leighton House, and the Leighton House website is here ⇒.  Viewers may also be interested in nearby Holland Park (inc Kyoto Gardens) and the extraordinary victoriana at 18 Stafford Terrace.

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Kevin Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Keven Moran

Photograph provided by kind permission of Leighton House – Courtesy of Will Pryce


About Picture this UK

Picture this UK (picturethisuk.org) Contains:- Best Places to Photograph in London, Best Places to Photograph near London, Best Places to Visit in London, Best Places to Visit near London, Best places to see in London and 100 + places to visit in London. Both inside and out.

Tower Bridge

British Museum

Please click on the ⇒Gallery⇐ for more

 

 

 

 

 


Brighten the Day 13

What needed is a little – whaa

but then a soothing and cheerful song

and then calm and pretty

and sweet

and something silly, but the dog doesn’t care – lives in the moment. Worth a try.

Dog & Flowers

This one is from the internet

more⇒


Cartoon Museum, London

The Cartoon Museum is moderately priced and hosts exhibitions, events and workshops for both children and adults (see website ⇒ ) and is very close to the British Museum ⇐ which is free to enter.  Cartoons and single frame caricatures  have been an integral part of British life and included political, satirical, sarcastic, social commentary, humour and the downright bawdy.  Earlier cartoons/caricatures, than those here, can be found at the Queens Gallery ⇒.

? but it is quite fascinating.




Although often irreverent, cartoonist could also be patriotic especially in times of war.

The infamous Andy Capp by Reg Smythe

And, a little social commentary from an unlikely source.

And, something to read.

And, learn how to draw cartoons.

Or the easy way, which made me hungry.


Vestry House Museum, Walthamstow And

To the left is the Vestry House Museum (website ⇒) and to the right is a quaint corner ⇒ and a church with some stained glass.

The vestry House Museum history and artifacts.

There are always accusations of corruption.  Both true and manufactured.



Edwin Alliot Verdon-Roe built and flew the first British working aircraft.  It crashed, but only a little bit.  He went on to produce the Avro 504, the most used British aircraft of of WWI.   Initially WWI was called the Great War, they didn’t know there would be another.

 







The more modern style of bicycle had a chain and gearing so that the big front wheel of the penny-farthing was no longer needed.  Bicycle clubs became very popular.

And, a pleasant garden out the back.

And, then there is a history of poverty and how it was dealt with.

Slowly, slowly it gets better.  The desire to help keeps on being born, unstoppable and defiant.  More at Wheels on Fire ⇐ .

And~

The Boat Lift.  Re-titled the the True Nature of Humanity by blogger Cindy Hope and worth knowing the truth it speaks.

And ~

And, be strong and be defiant and great each day new day as a gift.


Stained Glass and A Quaint Corner in Walthamstow

Not far from here is Walthamstow Street Market ⇒ which dates from 1885 and is the longest street market in Europe. Also in Walthamsow is the William Morris Gallery ⇐ and just behind that is beautiful Lloyd Park ⇐.


This spot is up St Marys Rd or by bus up Church Hill.  The sign post is rather whimsical as the only place open to the general public is the Vestry Museum and the church (for services and events).   There is of course a pub with a garden.  

Down the hill is Walthamstow.  Behind the tree is the Vestry House Museum (in another post).  To the right is one of the Alms Houses.

The Ancient House.  And, there’s that pub again.  Did I mention that it has a garden ?

And a n ancient Pillar Box for post.

St Mary’s Church is open for services and a number of events.  I managed to sneak in while they were preparing for a concert.

The above can be expanded for reading. Click on the image and then again to expand.

There wasn’t a lot of stained glass but it was of good quality.




So it’s goodbye from sunny (sometimes) Walthamstow


Brighten the Day 12 – Here Comes the Sun

Before we say goodbye to winter a little applause for the sparkles and glistens of frost and snow and yuletide festivities. 🙂

 – all three videos are worth seeing in HD at full screeen – with thanks to Lady Fi for making me think of Sugar Plum Fairies with her Frosty Views ⇒

And this version, by Lauren Cuthbertson, for the extraordinary elegance and precision . 🙂

And, then:-

A wash of colour

 

With spring there is the inevitable silliness (I insist upon it).  🙂

More Brighten the Day  ⇐


Postal Museum, London

The Royal Mail was first introduced by Henry VIII in 1516 and then made available to the public in 1635.  Later it became part of the General Post Office (GPO) which included the telephone system.  The Royal Mail has been integral to Britain’s growth and maintenance since early times.  More information (prices and location) can be found on it’s website ⇒.

Since early times the mail had to be protected from thieves and pirates.

 

 

 

It continued through two world wars, delivering to military personnel as well as civilians

 

 

The Royal Mail introduced innovations like the pneumatic delivery system, where a cylinder was sent by compressed air along a tube.  The Royal Mail system had more than 40 miles of tubes beneath London.  And ~.

 

 

 

Just across the road and down the hill a little is the the old Royal Mail’s underground system, where you can have a pre-booked ride (please see the website link above).

 

 

Down that hole

And return pre-packed ready to mail home.  🙂